3-D printing liquids

 

Material scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a technique to print three-dimensional structures made entirely of liquids. Using a modified 3-D printer, they inject streams of surfactant-sheathed water into silicone oil to form tubes of liquid within another liquid. The threads of water have been printed with diameters ranging between 10µm to 1mm with a variety of spiralling and branching structures. The researchers hope to use the technique to construct liquid electronics, perform molecular separation, or precisely deliver components to more complex structures.

Source: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/2018/03/26/print-all-liquid-3-d-structures/
Journal Article: https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201707603 (Advanced Materials)

Credits: Berkeley Lab News Center via Colin Sullender, Science GIFs and Google+

Rayton Solar’s silicon wafers

 

A CGI GIF by Rayton Solar, a solar panel manufacturer. They use laser technology to thinly slice silicon blocks with minimal wastage. As Rayton puts it “The standard industry manufacturing process wastes half the raw silicon block due to the saw blade that is used to cut silicon. Rayton Solar’s manufacturing technology is a zero waste process that represents a revolutionary new step for the solar industry.”

Credits: Rayton Solar via StartEngine, LLC.